Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Charlotte's Temper Tantrum on the Tarmac

Saturday, July 22, 2017

I have started into the fashion recap of this past week, but I thought I'd share my favorite moment from yesterday's farewell, and perhaps the whole tour. That would of course be Princess Charlotte's adorable little temper tantrum on the tarmac.


When the pictures first emerged it looked like the little princess had taken a tumble on the tarmac, but a brief review of the video revealed she was actually throwing a temper tantrum. Way more fun, I will tell you.




Charlotte was gifted a little book, and from the tenacity with which she attempted to hold onto it, she was excited to dive right in and start enjoying. When Kate took the book from Charlotte, it infuriated Her Royal Highness who began a very nimble dance of rage and protestation.



Kate leaned over and appeared to tell the little tyke there were cameras documenting the darling debacle, or probably more persuasive for a two-year old, told her the family still had some fun things to see before take-off. Charlotte paused mid-way in the air and ever so briefly turned to consider her mom's comment...


Nope. She dismissed it, and when Kate tried to start leading her off, took evasive tactical measures by hitting the ground in protest. This is a smart kid, I like her style. Look at George, he is looking on thinking that Charlotte is definitely winning front page today unless he can come up with something quick.



Kate was completely unfazed throughout the brief interlude, and swooped down to pick up her offspring. It's a real tribute to the Cambridges parenting how quickly Charlotte brightened up and behaved. In her mother's arms, there were no further kicks or cries and she was back in bright spirits shortly thereafter. 


Royalty needs to walk a fine line between mystery and accessibility, and one of the advantages to having the kids along on these tours is that the public gets to see (even if fleetingly) the normal side of the Cambridges. This cute little moment was very short, but gave everyone a peek at their private lives, and a little bit of that is always good for PR. 

62 comments:

  1. I loved this moment too! As I suspect everyone all over the world did that this has happened to. Happily for Kate, when she picked Charlotte up, Charlotte didn't arch her back and kick and scream, which is what one of my children did as people walked by staring at me (of course I didn't have millions of cameras in my face and have it recorded for posterity). I thought Kate looked a bit stressed after it happened, but she handled it beautifully. And I was quite surprised at how quickly Charlotte straightened up. My children could really get going. Kudos to Kate and William for being such hands-on parents. I'm so glad they brought the children with them. --J

    ReplyDelete
  2. I loved every moment that was documented of this tour.Kudos to the entire family. Traveling with children is stressful. Traveling as a royal family and having every moment documented and commented upon and analyzed is stressful exponentially. I applaud them for their gracious manner, good cheer, and the ability to smile and take it all in stride. Much love to the Cambridges !! Carry on!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Tsk always so much cuter when it's not your child😊. Kate handeled it all with Grace. Miss Charlotte is a handful ❤️

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When they were boarding the plane in Austria William tried to help Charlotte up the stairs and she swatted him away! She'll be keeping them busy for many years!
      ~ A

      Delete
    2. Poland not Austria!!
      ~ A

      Delete
  4. I really liked this moment because it made me feel much better about my kids' occasional public tantrums (haha). And Kate handled it like a boss!

    This is not to criticize, but I'm curious why they brought the children along if they weren't going to attend any public engagements with their parents (and probably didn't get to spend enough time with them between engagements for it to be a satisfying family vacation). If they're anything like other kids their age, they don't like disruptions to their routine and have a bit of trouble sleeping in unfamiliar places. They could've gotten cute send-off and homecoming snaps by bringing the kids to the airport, instead of along on the trip as well. And they would've certainly been in good hands back at home with the Middletons and Nanny Maria, especially since it was only a five day trip for Kate & William.

    Just wondering.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. These two children are learning about how to be important members of the BRF and a future king or possibly a future queen. They learn this by being exposed to it at a very early age and watching their parents who will be in time king and queen consort. They in fact are in school the whole time they are away. William spent 10 years figuring out if Catherine would be strong enough and had the skills to be able to cope with the job. His mother unfortunately did not.

      Delete
    2. I think homecoming snaps would be great but send off ones would be teary and close to a disaster. 9:55 is correct. On the job training from this age on will be invaluable to these kids for their role in life.

      Delete
    3. I commented below too that I think on the job training at a young age is important. Seeing Charlotte, unprompted, extend her arm to shake someone's hand is proof in the pudding. They need to know to be comfortable meeting new people and socializing in front of cameras. Plus, soon enough they will be in school and W&K will have to leave them behind - enjoy these opportunities while they exist!
      ~ A

      Delete
    4. If it was my daughter, who just celebrated her birthday a little over a week ago, I would want to be with her in the run up to her birthday. I suspect W & K wanted to be with George in the days preceding his birthday. Even if they only got to see the children at breakfast and bedtime, it is better than not seeing them for several days.

      Delete
    5. They could easily practice shaking hands at an event at home.

      Like someone below mentioned, I think exposing them more to the press and adoring fans at home would be much better practice!

      I know William is suspicious of the press, and children need some privacy, but I do think their kids are a bit *too* sheltered sometimes. I prefer the Swedish approach, tbh.

      Delete
    6. If W&K involved their children in engagements at home at this stage of the game, me thinks they'd be accused of using them for PR and it would distract from the focus of their work. A foreign tour is a little different because the Cambridge's are introducing themselves (as a family) to their hosts. Back home, they don't have the need to do so and I think it's okay for them to make an appearance at the Trouping, Christmas, polo, release birthday photos, etc.

      Delete
  5. Completely agree with your comments, Jane. Although this tour and the Canadian seemed to lack something in comparison to their other tours, I love the addition of the children if only for one or two moments like this. We hardly get to see PC and PG and when we do, most likely, it is in a contrived and controlled environment. The few interactions we've seen with the children on tour is priceless PR in the best form imo. I wish the Cambridges would embrace more of this stuff as do the Scandinavian royals. This is exactly what people want to see.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think the Scandinavian royals have it right - lots of publicly released photos, staged photos ops with the press, plus taking their kids to "work".
      ~ A

      Delete
    2. I do too, A. They seem to have struck the right balance.

      Delete
    3. No offense to the Scandinavian or any other royals but they and their children aren't at the same security risk as children in the British Royal Family. Unless you're from one of the countries the other families represent or you are a royal watcher, as the people who read this blog are, most people couldn't tell you the names of other royal families. The whole world knows who Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are, or at least they know the names William & Kate even if they couldn't give their proper titles. I don't think they can trot their children out quite as easily for PR purposes without putting a whole lot of security people on extra duty. Extra security costs would cause the republicans to cry foul.

      Delete
    4. Faith - they do and for the most part many of the families seem very close. To go along with your "contrived" comment, many of the Scandinavian photo ops with young children are contrived. They may be at their palace garden or the garden of a vacation home - places the children are already familiar with. They walk out, *click click click*, then they go back to reality. I saw recent photos from Sweden and the toddler (blanking on names right now! Oscar? Princess Victoria's son) was walking right up to the photographers and his parents are laughing in the background. No corralling or teaching him to stay away from them, rather probably happy to see him be so friendly.
      ~ A

      Delete
    5. I would like regular photo ops at a playground or something. And I think it would be better for the kids if they had regular exposure to press and public, funny to me that William and Kate don't get that. After all William was the one who wanted to give Kate so much time to get used to it... why not the same for his kids.
      I know parents can decide what they want it's just my honest opinion. Their kids do not live a normal life no matter how hard W&K want to think that. They need to expose them to the abnormal side of their life too - if you get my drift!

      Delete
    6. Anon 3:44 there are plenty of security risks faced by merely wealthy families so while the BRF may be more famous than other royal families it's not necessarily accurate to say that non-BRF royal children are not at the same security risk. If anything they might be at more since they do not have the fame that might act as a deterrent.

      Delete
    7. I absolutely agree that even these brief "appearances" are a learning experience for the children. But I don't ever see the BRF including young children as the Swedish royals do, for example. European royals appear to be more like a real family when they are in public. If the children make faces and act up, it's okay and you can see the king or queen enjoying the moment because it's part of life. On the other hand, I cannot imagine the Queen entertaining George or Charlotte during a church service, or Charles laughing if George ran off during a public appearance. The BRF is more formal, to say the least, and the most senior members still believe that "children should be seen, but not heard". I think we need to remember this as we discuss the decisions made by W&K because of the environment they live in. Again, no wonder William appreciates the Middleton's. :-)

      Delete
    8. Whether the Cambridges seem like a "real" family or not, they are a real family. It is unjust to compare the British RF to other European royals. Each has their own culture, their own ethos. Clearly W&K do not relish the idea of parading their children around at such an early age and are extremely judicious about when and where PG & PC are seen. They, after all, are their children, not our entertainment. Not all famous people, royal or not, want their children exposed to the paparazzi and idle curiosity. W&K are protective of their children's safety as well.. As closely guarded as the family is, there are depraved people in the world, as we all know. I'm sure the whole family is aware every time there is a public parade. There is always a security risk. Why exposes young tots to that often? We cannot possibly put ourselves in their shoes. We have no idea what their lives are like. BTW, we don't see much of the Spanish royal princesses either.

      Delete
  6. I loved this video of the tantrum! I also thought Charlotte recovered quite quickly!
    But...it's driving me crazy how both W & K are always bending down and squatting with the kids, theirs and others. As a parent myself, I know all about being "on the child's level" but it's getting to me. I have noticed in the past appearances with the children that both W & K are doting parents. Last year's trooping comes to mind...when the Queen told W to stand up. I am on the verge of thinking they are too doting.
    All in all, the kids are well behaved in public. They have a superb Nanny, it appears and W & K spent alot of time with the kids. As a full time working Mom, I sure am envious with all the time I'm sure they have to just enjoy their children. For all us working Moms, wouldn't having staff/assistants to do all the mundane chores in life be glorious? We could just enjoy our kids!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They probably have to squat down with them did the sheer reason that they wouldn't be able to hear anything otherwise. Look how loud it was in this video. They're standing next to multiple running engines. I can't imagine how loud it is on the Palace balcony as well. I have two kids, and they're quite a bit shorter than me, as are all children at that age, and if I didn't bend over almost to squatting when we're out in the public with a lot of noise going on, they wouldn't be able to hear me. Not to mention, think how overwhelming it must be for them with all the people there and cameras. Squatting down makes them feel more secure as well. Give them a break. They're two and four and have been on only a few public engagements. Thru need to feel heard and secure from their parents.

      Delete
    2. If you think getting down to your child's level a lot is "doting" on them, you are mistaken. It's called good parenting, bonding with your child, communicating well, etc.

      I am very sadden that anyone might consider this behavior "doting".

      Delete
    3. Clare you make an excellent point. I suspect that at home they both squat down to the kids level but also give"instruction" from the standing position or from across the room. Also being in the public eye if Kate and William get in the habit of being very close and private with the kids when correcting in public it will save the kids from embarrasament. A really good habit for everyone to get into.

      Delete
    4. Anonymous 1:46 you've hit the nail on the head. They're modeling good parenting.

      Delete
    5. I don't see it as doting. I agree that it's about communicating (face to face, eye contact) and, to a degree, controlling what is and isn't overheard. W&K engage and guide their children along in some of the extraordinary situations they have to face. We've also seen Kate get down on George's level to give him a gentle warning or two.

      This may be unrelated, but I am reminded of a day in the hair salon as I observed a polite little girl (probably 6 or 7) trying to talk to her mother as they sat and waited. The girl was well behaved, but every time she said something to her mother, all she got was a "yes", "no", or "okay" as the mother continued to text away on her cell phone. Interesting priorities and communication skills. :-( I felt so sorry for that little girl.

      Delete
    6. When I was very little (3 to 6), my favorite way to talk to my mom was to put my arm under her jaw, like a hug, and press our cheeks together, side by side. I would tell her I needed to tell her something important and she would bend down and I would do this. Then once cheek to cheek, I would tell her. (Not in a whisper, just in a normal voice.)

      I remember doing this and so does my mom, she loved it. As the youngest of three, I wanted her full attention and the closeness that this gave us. Plus I felt she would understand me better. (Yes, little kids can feel all these things.)

      Connecting with your child, even when they are very little, is the most important thing. Allowing them to be heard, feeling their words matters, communicating well with them so you can guide them - nothing is more important.

      Delete
    7. You are right, Clare. It is very noisy in this instance. That makes sense. I hadn't thought of that initially when I posted my comment. To others, I, in no way, said or insinuated that W&K are anything but good/attentive parents. If you read my comment closely you will see I said "on the verge". I am just not used to seeing so much bending and squatting down. I have not or do not recall seeing other royals do so as much as the photos I see of W&K. It just looks so awkward and I cringe a bit when Kate squats always wearing skirts/dresses...I think to myself, gosh I hope the cameras don't "see" what they shouldn't.
      My comment was also in regards to the whole of photos we have seen and not just in this instance. It's just my opinion, right or wrong, and ultimately it doesn't really matter. We all come from different backgrounds with different experiences that shape who we are and what we think.
      To Anon 1:46 Don't be saddened. I do not in any way believe being an attentive parent is doting. I, in fact, believe quite the opposite.



      Delete
    8. 12:42, what a sweet memory!! And I think you're exactly right.

      Delete
    9. RoyalFan,

      Thanks!:)

      12:42

      Delete
  7. I loved this moment, too, Jane! There is a departure photo where she appears to be trying to read two books while boarding the plane. I think this shows us that they read a lot at home, which also speaks to their parenting.

    And let's not forget that George managed to steal front pages when he cupped his face with an angelic look on his face.

    I'm glad they decided to bring the children along. I think the kids need to learn from a young age this is their normal. I also loved seeing George and Charlotte shaking hands and Charlotte doing a curtsy - this will be their lives, constantly meeting new people in front of cameras. Also nice for the family to see each other every morning and evening.

    ~ A

    ReplyDelete
  8. Way more fun. I like that William watched and seemed to know it was handled--no problem. Then they teamed up to look at what was next. Also loke how the Duchess of Cambridge removes the papers from Charlotte's hands and doesn't look back even when there is a wind up. The Cambridges seem like a solid team.

    ReplyDelete
  9. A few thoughts as a mother of two little ones the same ages as G & C: 2 & 4

    1. While it may be adorable to royal fans to see a royal tantrum. . there is nothing adorable about it to the mother. Yesterday my 2 year old did the same tantrum dance at a cross-walk when I insisted we hold hands, and then threw himself on the road (ack!). . .the awaiting cars, and pedestrians mostly smiled in empathy. . .maybe some judged, but who knows. As I picked up my toddler, there is a fleeting thought of what are people thinking. But I did smile at "my" scene, thinking about how Kate must have felt with millions of viewers. Probably slightly mortified, although she kept her dignity as most parents do. . .hoping against all hope a distraction provides relief. I share this because I don't think the right word for this "adorable" (I honestly don't think that is an accurate word). . .but rather "empathatically amusing."

    2. Prince George is very similar to my four year old who is reticent in new situations. I observed how they changed their family "order" after his very reluctant arrival in Poland. When I saw William, pull & coax George out of the plane in Poland, I immediately identified with that! George did so much better with holding BOTH parents' hands in subsequent flights.. .to keep his body in align with forward walking ;)

    3. George also "shone" best at the departure of this tour. . .just like Canada, when he did that amusing two-handed wave. I'm sure his parents "primed the pump" with incentives, and he he just went for it. It would seem he is a child that transitions slowly and methodically. I know that type well with my eldest, who is also four.

    4. In a way my heart is heavy for George when I think of his future. . .while still young I know, some children already have a natural aptitude for befriending strangers. Our neighbour kids are like that. . .they thrive on meeting new people. Other kids, like my four-year-old. . well, it's a lot of training, intentional role-modelelling, and it's "work" to them to greet strangers. It's just too bad that sometimes the disposition doesn't suit the role. . .in fact, a lot of the Windsors are more introverted and one can see their intentional efforts in fulfilling their role, and also the drain in their eyes.

    5. I truly believe that consistent on-the-job training is needed for George. . .I hope W & K can see that after this tour. . most people know socializing children or puppies takes intentional consistent training. . .On his first arrival he kept his back the entire time to the rather daunting soldier line. . .and only straightened out after they passed them. Watch the video and you will see. There was so much stimulus overwhelming him initially, and his body language says it all. Practice does not perfect, but practice makes progress. Their approach with their children seems choppy. . .and nearly volcanic with emotion from both the public and their own children. . .which is heightened/augmented due to infrequent sightings.

    6. Finally, something jars me when people comment in seemingly disbelief, "see they're just like us." Yes, these moments give us a chance to identify with them. But that type of comment is rooted in fairy tale, which this is not. It also unintentionally elevates them and places them on a pedestal. . .which inevitably produces a grand fall of disappointment later on. It's actually a dangerous paradigm. I do not take satisfaction (or feel better about myself) from a tantrum for a HRH, any more than the kid from our neighbourhood grocery store. To feel better about oneself with another parents distress, speaks of insecurity. But I do empathetically smile when I see one ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's a lovely comment Sara. I'm hesitant to say anything at all bracing for the "stop judging their parenting" backlash, but I am not sure what they were thinking bringing them on this trip. I have a 6 and 3 yr old (and one on the way!) and putting them in strange places and in strange beds for a week is only done if an absolute necessity. Like vacation or having to visit family or something. It's just a recipe for bad behavior, and I can't blame them. And even when I try to avoid any potential problems, I can still have one! And I just keep reminding myself, no one is probably paying as much attention as i THINK they are :)

      Delete
    2. I think, as others have commented on, that it's impossible to compare the lives most young children live (and will grow up into) with the lives of G&C - they need to experience things others children don't because their lives will be drastically different. Normalizing some of the stranger aspects of BRF life (jetting around, sleeping in unfamiliar beds, netting new people in unfamiliar environments) is essential to helping G&C be as "normal" as possible when they are adults.

      Delete
    3. I can identify with your description of your children, I am a outgoing mother with four children, all now in their teens. Three of my kids would be considered quite 'introverted' and one is certainly an 'extrovert'! My eldest was especially socially awkward, and while I agree that repeated to socially challenging situations would be beneficial, in my experience just growing up (with lots of parental support and encouragement) teaches children how to deal with situations in which they are uncomfortable.
      In relation to taking the children on tour, it is hard for both parents and children but this is their life, it is what they do. I would much rather have my children with me, to experience it together, than to always leave them behind. No matter how good the childcare arrangements, children benefit from being with their parents. And George and Charlotte need to realise that this is their 'normal'.

      Delete
    4. I don't think we can be certain what George's temperament is like from the few times we have seen him at airports. We would have to see him in a variety of situations.

      Delete
  10. Kate handled it beautifully but as I watched it, my own response was palpable. The way the knees buckle while wearing heels and the elbow joint pops when a two-year old decides to hit the floor is a familiar feeling. "Come on; Mass starts in two minutes." Of course, I'm sure church waits for the Cambridges to be in their pew, late or not.

    Sara from Canada, I'm sure you've heard it before...ignore the judgement, smile sweetly, and take heart in the empathy.

    ReplyDelete
  11. We had 3 sons, 2 were twins. Each was so different at every age. At age 2 the oldest would politely interact with strangers but not get too close. One twin would happily climb out of the stroller and trot off behind strangers and not look back (scary for moms), while the other twin would be shy and turn his head away. By the time they were 4, they were all nice but suspicious--I think of 4 as an anxious age. They changed so many times through the years and I think they are all polite and outgoing as adults.

    You never know with kids! I'm very sympathetic with parents. It takes many years for humans to catch on, and George and Charlotte haven't been here very long. Anyone who is a parent has been around tantrums a lot and knows all the behaviors, especially throwing yourself on the ground. I think most of us smile because we've been there.

    The Swedish royals don't get the overwhelming crowds and attention that the UK royals attract, and it may be easier on the little ones. All those strangers with cameras, long-range lenses, camera phones and shouts would certainly disturb a little child, and the Cambridges are trying to introduce the kids to royal life, without them running in fear. I think they are being cautious with the kids. They've seen a lot of craziness we haven't!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is very true. So many times when we see these little videos the sound doesn't play or the background noise covers the photographers shouting their names from all directions in hope that someone will turn around and give them the money shot. It would overwhelm anyone and especially a small child.

      Delete
    2. When I think of the Swedish royals it isn't just crowds and public appearances. It is that they more frequently release photos of the family together or individually. The Swedish royals also arrange photo calls where it is a group of photographers and that is it. No noisy crowds or safety issues. A controlled environment. I think W&K could give this a try. For example, invite some photographers to their KP gardens for 10-15min, then they go inside and the photogs leave. Of course I don't know what's possible, I'm just explaining how it could be easy, safe and quick. Builds a better relationship with the press and public and is good exposure for the kids.
      ~ A

      Delete
    3. I agree A. This is exactly what I had in mind when I brought up the Scandinavians. I guess when I wrote controlled and contrived, I meant posed. I think more frequent photos or video of the Cambridge children doing mundane things would be wonderful. A short video of Princess Estelle making her mom pretend food in her little playhouse was released recently. I think people would like seeing something like that with PG and PC and it would be fun for them to do not to mention get PR.

      Delete
  12. My comment got eaten for about the third time. Luckily, you have said it already, Rebound, and I can give up.
    I will add that Estelle's little brother may turn out completely different and bury his head in Mama's shoulder. If Victoria had had to force Estelle as George must be prodded and nudged, I think the story might have been different. Victoria seems like a very tender sort of person who has recently spoken out about her reactions. I don't think Estelle's photo-ops reflect an effort to change the outcome. I think the Swedes just lucked out with Estelle. I think Charlotte is on her way to being another Estelle and we may see more of her than we did of George ..
    Also, most photos of the Scandinavian children are in a known, controlled environment such as Palace grounds, church, or grounds of a vacation home with known, consistent photographers. Quite a contrast to the noisy, flashing, unknown crowd the Cambridge children face. anon1

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anon1 I agree and have said it above - Scandinavian children have controlled photo ops exactly as how you have described. I really wish the Cambridges would attempt this!
      ~ A

      Delete
    2. They have, many times, with resulting complaints about lighting, photo publishing forum, ownership of photo rights, posing, facial features (one eye too big), possible photo alterations, lack of professional photographer, or pro photog, but related to a Kate PA....and so on. On one Kate blog George was compared to a concentration camp child with the release of his birthday photo Friday. The reference was to his wearing a striped shirt, of all things. The comments were in such poor taste for a number of reasons, I can't understand why a moderator would allow this on what is supposedly a quality Kate site.
      I'm amazed they continue to share their photos at all.
      I do think it would be interesting to actually count the total number of Swedish versus Cambridge photos during the last twelve months. And tour pictures count as much as summer/winter vacation ones. anon1.

      Delete
    3. Another thought, since the well-worn "The Swedish do it better" topic was introduced. Estelle is a remarkably charming, independent, and out-going child. It remains to be seen how her baby brother will develop. If Estelle had instead been a very shy, introverted or introspective child such as George seems to be, one wonders whether Victoria would have put her in as many photo-ops. Somehow, I think not. I can't see Victoria willingly nudging and prodding a reluctant Estelle into public viewing, considering what Victoria has recently revealed about her own problems with celebrity and expectations. Probably the only way to compare is if her son turns out shy and is not exposed to the extent that Estelle was.

      If a child is too young or not emotionally accepting of new situations, crowds, noise, soldiers with fixed bayonets on guns...all the "getting used to" in the world will do is set off behavior problems immediately or lay the foundation for problems further on down the road ..if the child yields to pressure but stores up anger and resentment about being forced. I don't think there is much "storing up" done in the Cambridge family now, considering the couple's emphasis on talking about feelings. anon1
      I am conflicted on this subject as I immensely enjoy seeing the photos that the Cambridges make available, yet deplore the public and media pressure on the family that is likely behind some of it. I could be content with birthdays, Trooping, and Christmas, with a polo or Granny photo op or two thrown in.

      Delete
    4. Anon1, I think you did a good job of covering all the "issues" with photos that W&K have shared over the years. Amazing, isn't it?

      And I, too, would expect that children's personalities and the parents' own experience (as children) would play a huge role in how they raise their children.

      May I also point out that William and Victoria had very, very different experiences as children and young adults. And the two royal families have different views on a "child's place" in all of this. Like it or not, all of this must be factored in.

      Delete
    5. I don't think I covered all of them, unfortunately.
      As you say, royalfan, there are so many factors involved. It is not just a matter of meeting a photographer in the garden for a snapshot. Who is the photographer or should a group be allowed; what forum for the initial release; who owns the photo; added to the myriad of details including clothing-reuse from a former event, use of hand me downs, shorts versus trousers for George; pose on play equipment--risk of harm; pose with a pet--but no ice cream or whatever that was...etc. etc..
      Those three photos the brothers recently released of themselves and their Mum were private until now. Many of the photos of the Queen and her sister as children were not shared at the time but were released as part of biographies, to mark an anniversary, and for various exhibits long after her childhood.
      Meanwhile, I think we can look forward to a first day of school photo of George not too long from now. I think there may even be some family event or press release around the Diana memorial time in late August that includes her grandchildren. I think that would be a lovely gesture, if an appropriate event could be found. Something light and joyous.anon1

      Delete
    6. Yes, Anon1, I do recall the concerns expressed over George offering Lupo ice cream. Perhaps we should photoshop Estelle into the same photo and it would be seen as a very natural and lovely photo of a precious little girl and her beloved pooch. 😉

      Delete
    7. Is George shy? Or is he just so not used to photo ops that he acts shy (or maybe just bored and being a bit rude)? You get children used to things by exposure, not omission.

      The boy is going to be the King some day! And duty will call with engagements before then. Let's hope W & K have prepared him for the publicity part of it properly by increased exposure, not continued constant sheltering.

      All the other European royals do things differently. They can't all be wrong.

      And yes, the media hounded Diana. But she courted their attention as well (and even let them know where she would be). And yes, the paparazzi had a hand in her death, but no seatbelts and intoxication did too.

      Delete
  13. I think the very best thing Kate does is be a good Mom. She strikes the perfect balance between firm and kind, which many parents don't.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. Kate seems a very loving mother, but also quite strict as well, which is good to see.

      Delete
    2. She is the one who seems to take the lead in making sure both kids are polite and greet and say good bye properly along with thank you to those they meet and are helping them. Love that she is instilling proper and respectful behavior from the very beginning with the the children. Someone else mentioned re the taking the kids on the trips that Kate and William probably enjoy their being with them, even if only mornings and nights and that for the kids this will be their life much of the time. I had not thought about it in this way but think it is a valid point.

      Delete
  14. I was thinking about one thing: how the public can look at the parents when their child has a tantrum. Everyone is so stressed about it. However a tantrum is not a sign of bad parenting, just a clear sign of a growing human being. They are learning their emotions. We all go through it. If we make the parents feel ashamed, we kinda teach the kids: "hide your feelings". That is just my opinion

    ReplyDelete
  15. Taking 'evasive tactical measures by hitting the ground in protest' as you call it, or 'a first, albeit brief, royal sit-in' (documented one, that is, I'm sure there have been plenty that went unobserved by the public) :D
    I so love this post, and your way of recounting the episode, it always leaves me with a smile so I've been coming back for just one more peek again and again ...

    ReplyDelete
  16. It was over in a matter of seconds, and Kate handled it beautifully.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I am a little puzzled and don't know what to think about Kate's comment to Charlotte and would love to hear everyone's thoughts about it : she tells her " Charlotte there are cameras" (yeah lip ready comes in handy sometimes !) I don't believe this is the kind of thing you say to à two year old, not sure she can understand what it means. Even if they are not normal kids no matter how hard K&W want to believe it, it feels to me like a "please behave in front of the cameras because we have to show a perfect image of the perfect family in front of cameras. Makes me wonder if all this good parenting in front of cameras is that much real and question how much they pretend in front of the cameras. Don't get me wrong I love reading your blog and the work the cambridges do especially for kids, but this simple phrase raises question : is any of what they are showing real or is it all a play ?
    I do wonder a lot if kate really likes what she is doing when I see some pics where she is all smiley in front of the cameras but seems bored to hell on uncontrolled pics. Is she really into the royal family duty or is she just enjoying the life of a princess ?
    Anyway as a parent who praises positiv but firm parenting, meaning there are rules to follow and for the rest just be a kid and enjoy life, I am really deranged by what kate told her toddler, I feel this isn't right to tell to a child. I sometime think they are overprotecting the kids and that their fear of a faux pas in front of the camera have created a bubble around their kids when they praise to want a normal childhood for them. I don't question the as parents, the kids look happy I just wonder if their method isn't pulling away the kids from reality rather than having them raised just like us all.
    Let me know what you think about it

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't believe for one moment that W&K are "pretending" at anything. From what I have observed, they consistently reassure, engage, and guide their children in order for them to understand what is happening and expected during these appearances. And if they didn't, they'd be criticized for that as well.

      Regarding Kate looking "bored as hell" ... is she expected to smile non-stop while she's out in public? Don't we all have moments when we may listen, think, assess, etc.? If that is defined as "bored as hell", I promise you that there are a lot of bored public figures in this world.

      Delete
    2. Haha loved your bored as hell answer ! Sorry I literally translated a French expression into English maybe it does not sound how it does is France. I meant she sometimes does not look really interested by what she is visiting or whom she is speaking to etc like she is there because she has to but doesn't really know what she is doing there nor enjoying it. Maybe it's just the cameras that bother her but if that is the case she will have to get used to it considering her future role !
      As for their kids you might be right, they seem to be following the positiv parenting guidelines but it seems to me they are a little clumsy at it sometimes maybe for wanting to do it too perfectly because of their public image. Putting too much. Pressure on themselves as parents. What do you think about the comment she made to Charlotte there are cameras ?

      Delete
  18. This comment is really late--my computer hard drive died and had to be replaced just as this tour began.

    So, I've been doing some catch-up.

    This post, on the last day of the tour, gives me a chance to express my overall impressions. so here goes.

    1. Light purple/lavender is a fantastic colour on Kate. Who knew?! I think it topples red!

    2. I've seen a few pics of George which were a fundamental WOW! for me. One was of him looking out of his plane window--unmistakably a lookalike to his great-uncle, Charles. Earl Spencer. On the pics of the last day of the Poland-German Tour, when he was photographed in a helicopter, looking like all of his Christmases had come at once, some of his mannerisms were so Diana-like that it blew me away. Sooo, he no longer looks like a Middleton to me; the Spencer genes seem to predominate.

    3. Charlotte was never so adorable as when she staged her hissy-fit on this last day of the tour; it demonstrated that she had a personality--until this day, she seemed a tad bland, IMO. First, there was the stomping of her little feet; she then followed by her own protest sit-in on the tarmac, which failed--or did it? The whole episode came to an end when Kate simply swooped her up and carried her--her tears dried up--giving rise to the suspicion that this was exactly what Charlotte wanted. Well done, kiddo!!

    JC

    ReplyDelete

The rules for commenting are simple: be polite. Please be respectful of the BRF/Middletons, even in criticism; please be respectful of your fellow readers, even in disagreement. Vulgarity will disqualify a comment.

Debate is welcome, direct and personal insults are not. Topics we tend to avoid here: "does Kate work enough?" and "Is Kate too skinny?" Everything is subject to approval.

I (Jane Barr) moderate all comments. If a comment is live, I approved it. If you find something offensive, or think my approval was an error, please email me at princesskateblog(at)gmail.com.

At times, an acceptable comment just goes missing. If you felt your comment should have been approved, but did not show up within five hours, again, pop an email to the above address.

Happy chatting!